Book cover of 'The Paradox of Choice'

The Paradox of Choice

#books / non-fiction · 3/5

When all the costs (in time, money, and anguish) involved in getting information about all the options are factored in, satisficing is the maximizing strategy.

By Barry Schwartz

Notes

If you seek and accept only the best, you are a maximizer.


To satisfice is to settle for something that is good enough and not worry about the possibility that there might be something better.


When all the costs (in time, money, and anguish) involved in getting information about all the options are factored in, satisficing is the maximizing strategy.


When we are making decisions, we should think about how each of the options will feel not just tomorrow, but months or even years later.


We can remind ourselves to be grateful for what we have.


The blessing of modest expectations is that they leave room for many experiences to be a pleasant surprise.


Having control over one’s life matters.


Helplessness induced by failure or lack of control leads to depression if a person’s causal explanations for that failure are global, chronic, and personal.


“Optimists” explain successes with chronic, global, and personal causes and failures with transient, specific, and universal ones. “Pessimists” do the reverse.


It is the pessimists and maximizers who are candidates for depression.


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